-2
votes

This is a follow-up to this question.

Now I want to ask for some examples of Love Live OST songs that use the diminished viio chord, if they DO use the chord.

Will THIS be on-topic, then?


Because it is strange that Love Live very often uses the six major and minor diatonic chords while trying their best to AVOID using the diminished diatonic chord. Yes, that particular chord.

It is VERY interesting. I've never seen Love Live use that chord so far while in other anime songs it is used quite often.

For example, the Blend S OP theme (Bon Appetit S) begins with "flip-flopping" I, bVII, and viio chords all over a tonic bass pedal.

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Would you ever think Love Live would write such a harmony like this?

3
votes

No.

Say what you will about relativeness, but keep in mind we explicitly stated to you prior that music theory questions are off-topic. The subject of diminished cords is music theory. No matter how much you try to twist things it is still music theory and not on-topic. Please keep in mind that we do not have the expertise to answer these questions, and that is why they are considered off-topic.

To understand what a diminished chord, one must first understand the basics of music theory. We cannot assume that lay users of this recreational Q&A site (as diverse as it can be) can understand such concepts and comprehend your intent. Such is why the question is considered off-topic. Lack of knowledge or expertise to discern context, due to specialized knowledge beyond the current scope of the site (anime and manga fans, not professionals).

  • 1
    Contrary to what you believe, you're not. In actuality it seems that you are trying to fit a question about diminished cords, into a poorly scoped anime song list question. – кяαzєя Apr 16 at 19:04
  • 1
    See my answer for an expanded explanation. – кяαzєя Apr 16 at 19:22
  • 1
    Associating it with a particular series does not automatically make it on-topic unfortunately. At heart, it's still a music theory question. – кяαzєя Apr 17 at 11:26
  • 2
    We can't always have what we want. – кяαzєя Apr 18 at 14:24
  • 1
    Why do you insist on perpetuating this? – кяαzєя Apr 20 at 1:50
  • @KRaZER Is if forbidden on this site to associate the vii dim chord with BLEND S and then accuse LOVE LIVE for not using that chord? – user45359 Apr 27 at 9:16
  • @KRaZER I am a big fan of both Blend S AND Love Live, and I am not doing anything bad. It seems like you don't want me to be a fan with either of the series. – user45359 Apr 27 at 9:17
  • I'm not going to go to have a reelaborate everything on this matter again. No matter how you twist things to try to fit, what's not on topic remains not on topic. If you insist on continuing with these trivial pursuits, I will be forced to apply sanctions on you. – кяαzєя Apr 27 at 9:25
-3
votes

Krazer says:

No. To understand what a diminished chord, one must first understand the basics of music theory. We cannot assume that lay users of this recreational Q&A site (as diverse as it can be) can understand such concepts and comprehend your intent. Such is why the question is considered off-topic. Lack of knowledge or expertise to discern context, due to specialized knowledge beyond the current scope of the site (anime and manga fans, not professionals).


But even if it's not on-topic, I don't know what to say.

Earlier today I was looking up on some sheet music of anime songs. When I landed on the Love Live OST Phychic Fire by Nico, Eri, and Maki, this is what I found:

E half-dim -> A - Dm

The key of the OST is D minor. I was totally shocked because I see a E half-diminished chord (Em7b5, iiø7 of D minor) hanging all over measure 20. This was already surprising enough, but I reached a point where I peed myself (without even making it to the restroom) when I noticed the cadence of Em7b5-A-Dm (iiø7-V-i, with the soprano ending on F5) on measures 20-22, known as a root position IAC.


Now what I am curious about is why the diatonic half-diminished chord (or diminished triad) is used more often as iiø in minor than in viiø in major.