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So while going through the review queues, in particular "Low Quality Posts" I often come across answers such as this one (imgur mirror).

Ideally what seems the best fit is putting this "We're looking for long answers that provide some explanation and context.[...]" plaque there, but I don't have the reputation to do that.

Now I could vote for deletion, but

  • I don't want to do it using the "without comment" option, because I feel it doesn't give the users a chance to react and they wont learn from it.
  • What I often end up choosing is "This is commentary on another post, not an answer" but the text doesn't really capture what I want to express. At least as a new user I would not immediately understand from this that I'm supposed to write longer, better researched answers.
  • I could choose the no comment option and then write a more fitting comment myself, but that's a pain, even if I started using the AutoReviewComments userscript. And we can't really expect every reviewer to do this, for such a common problem, no? It also wouldn't allow for 'stacking' of the same comment from multiple reviewers, because everyone would likely write slightly different text

I could just vote down, but a) that's not available as an option in this queue (isn't this what moves it to review in the first place?) and b) it also wouldn't help the user to know what's wrong.

Or am I supposed to flag these? As what then?

  • "not an answer" doesn't fit because it is an answer, just not a good one.
  • "very low quality" doesn't really fit since while it may not be good, it could be salvaged if the user was told how.
  • in need of moderator intervention? But then we get back to me having to write or have ready a template text for this way too common case.

Currently I end up skipping many of these questions, which seems like a waste of time for both me and other reviewers. What am I missing here, I can't be the only one with this problem? The fact, that my example answers was deleted while I was typing this means that this is apparently really the way to go, but how does the user then know what they have to do better next time? Do they get an "RTFM" with their deletion?

I'm aware there is a very similar question here however it only addresses what would happen afterwards (and there seem to be deleted comments, so I don't completely understand what happened there).

This one also goes in a similar direction, but from that I would say the answer is to flag and write a comment for another reviewer, is that really it?

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    This one particular answer is actually by a person I recruited to the site. I have noted him that he can edit his answer to improve it ;) See le message – Dimitri mx Oct 13 '15 at 14:27
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    Thanks for the image mirror senshin. Gao pointed out in chat that since the user of the example answer had not even seen the anime in question, this answer might indeed be considered not salvageable. I'm inclined to agree, but the general question remains. I'll add an additional example, once I find another one. – mivilar Oct 13 '15 at 16:31
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    In one case, while admittedly probably not low quality to that extent, an answerer only gave a one-sentence answer with the link. Since I thought they had the right idea anyway, I edited the answer to include the relevant section from the link. That said, in this case I had a reasonably good idea of what the OP's intentions were, and the edit I had to make was minimal. In an answer like the one that was converted to a comment here, such a process would be significantly harder. – Maroon Oct 13 '15 at 21:39
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    The example answer is not salvageable, since the post itself doesn't contain much value in the first place. I would just delete it outright - comment optional. Salvageable posts should 1) provide a (full/partial) answer to the question 2) in cases of controversial claim, provide evidence to the claim 3) is readable by people who don't necessary follow the series. A post which requires too much effort to salvage should just be deleted to save community's effort to maintain them. – nhahtdh Oct 14 '15 at 8:06

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